32feet and Windows Apps

Some time ago I created a subset of 32feet.NET to extend the Bluetooth functionality in Windows Phone 8.0. This was for the Silverlight app model and the only API at the time was based around the Proximity APIs. When Windows Phone 8.1 came along it brought a whole new Bluetooth (and Bluetooth LE) API which was, for the most part, consistent with Windows 8.1. I never got around to updating my code for this model.

Looking forwards Windows 10 is just around the corner and the UWP app model includes this same consistent API, with a few additions, across all the flavours of Windows – IoT, Phones and all shapes and sizes of PC. This time I went back to the drawing board and looked at what functionality was missing and could be added in.

One of the new APIs in Windows 10 is the DevicePicker in Windows.Devices.Enumeration. This is not strictly Bluetooth functionality – any class of device which can be enumerated can be used with it. However it serves as a Bluetooth device picker just fine. Since Windows 10 on phones is a little further away than the imminent launch on the desktop I thought there was a good case for providing this UI now to Windows Phone 8.1 apps and showing how to wrap it to pick Bluetooth devices. Thus you can easily reuse the same code in a Windows 10 project further down the track. Thus the InTheHand.Devices.Enumeration.DevicePicker was born. It uses the same API the exception being that screen rectangles passed in are ignored for Windows Phone as it uses a ContentDialog to pop up the selector. You can still customise the foreground/background and accent colors to match your app. For example the sample code displays this:-

32feet DevicePicker

To use the DevicePicker for Bluetooth devices you need to first have the capabilities set correctly in your package manifest (see here for details). Then assuming you have a button or similar to allow the user to start the selection process you can use the following code:-

string aqs = RfcommDeviceService.GetDeviceSelector(RfcommServiceId.ObexObjectPush);

DevicePicker picker = new DevicePicker();
picker.Appearance.BackgroundColor = Color.FromArgb(0xff, 0, 0x33, 0x33);
picker.Appearance.ForegroundColor = Colors.White;
picker.Appearance.AccentColor = Colors.Goldenrod;

// add our query string
picker.Filter.SupportedDeviceSelectors.Add(aqs);

// prompt user to select a single device
DeviceInformation dev = await picker.PickSingleDeviceAsync(new Rect());
if (dev != null)
{
   // if a device is selected create a BluetoothDevice instance to get more information
   BluetoothDevice device = await BluetoothDevice.FromIdAsync(dev.Id);

   // or get the service which you can connect to
   RfcommDeviceService service = await RfcommDeviceService.FromIdAsync(dev.Id);
}

The CodePlex project includes the source code and two samples – one showing the device picker and retrieving device information, the other a Chat application (which is interoperable with the existing 32feet BluetoothChat sample on other platforms. The binaries for the DevicePicker are up on NuGet in this package.

That covers off device selection, the other main area I knew needed some attention is Service Discovery. The Windows API provides the ability to supply custom SDP attributes when creating a service (or as mentioned in a previous blog post an “extension” record containing custom attributes). It also gives the ability to retrieve SDP records. However in both cases it uses IBuffer (the WinRT equivalent of a byte array). Therefore the other part of the new 32feet project is a set of functionality for building (and eventually parsing) SDP attribute values and records. I haven’t published this to NuGet yet as I’m still working on it but the code is there if you fancy a look.

So the next step for 32feet on Windows is a DevicePicker for 8.1 which allows you to painlessly move your code forward to 10, and a portable SDP library which will work with 8.1 and 10 and possibly outside of Windows platforms too in the future…

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